Monthly Archives: April 2012

Looking after our Shuswap watershed

Looking after our Shuswap watershed

Shuswap residents can take pride in knowing that the protection of their watershed is continuing to improve thanks to the work of the Shuswap Lakes Integrated Planning Process (SLIPP). At the April 12th all-committee meeting, government and public representatives were provided with updates on all the projects underway.

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SEAS and the Adams River

A 4 minute documentary with a brief history of the Shuswap Environmental Action Society followed by a backgrounder on the upcoming campaign to purchase the property adjacent to the mouth of the Adams River and add it to Roderick Haig-Brown Park, with the goal to increase protection for the world famous Adams River sockeye salmon, improve the conservation values of the park and help boost the local economy. Includes historical and recent still photos and two video clips of the property. To learn more, visit www.seas.ca.

A Blind Bay pioneer story

A Blind Bay pioneer story

It is always a joy to discover articles or books about Shuswap history. Thus, when the copy of “In those Days – The Reedman Family Story” arrived in the mail, the thin book was read quickly with interest. John Reedman, who was often called the “mayor” of Blind Bay, was one of the first to homestead there.

One of the most fascinating portions of this book, written by Isabelle Reedman who was married to Ken, one of the family patriarch’s many grandsons, is the description of why the Reedman’s decided to emigrate and how they ended up in the Shuswap. Her research included interviews with family elders and was aided by the diaries and journals of John’s son Archie who passed away in 1958.  Stories like these, of how the pioneers arrived in the Shuswap, provide us with insight about the motives of the original settlers and help us understand how our communities formed.

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2012 Federal budget is a travesty

My letter to the editors:

The 2012 federal budget is a travesty, as it will boost the profits for the one percent and the big resource industries, while it is a disaster for the rest of us. It is an attack on the environment despite the fact that in the long term a healthy economy depends on a healthy environment.

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